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Amity, as you know, means friendship

Posts tagged space

Oct 21 '14
spaceexp:

Race to the Stars - Milky Way over the Alvord Desert Playa
Source: paulweeksphotos (reddit)

spaceexp:

Race to the Stars - Milky Way over the Alvord Desert Playa

Source: paulweeksphotos (reddit)

Oct 16 '14
erictrautmann:

spaceexp:

Alexander Gerst doing a spacewalk on EVA27

I love space.

erictrautmann:

spaceexp:

Alexander Gerst doing a spacewalk on EVA27

I love space.

Oct 9 '14
we-are-star-stuff:


The effects of space travel on the human body
Many people dream of travelling into orbit, to the Moon or even beyond. However, those who experience the reality of spaceflight face a succession of potential health problems.
“Space isn’t an environment we’ve evolved to survive in,” says Kevin Fong, founder of the Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme Environment Medicine at University College London. “It’s wrong to conceive space travel as this long haul flight with some floating around thrown in – it’s an expedition, like any other expedition.”
So, let’s say you are lucky enough to have bagged yourself a space flight. As you lie back on your couch during the final seconds of countdown, what can you expect to happen to your body over the coming minutes, hours, days or even months? Here’s a timeline of effects from those in the know – scientists, engineers and astronauts who can speak from experience about what happens when human bodies are pushed to the limit, and how to best deal with it.
T-plus 10 seconds: Possible loss of consciousness The spacecraft has cleared the tower and the acceleration is building to 4G. Your body feels four times its normal weight. Crushed back into the seat, moving your arms is increasingly difficult.
“G-forces push blood into the feet and we need blood supply to our brain to stay conscious,” explained Jon Scott, Senior Scientist at Qinetiq’s Human Sciences division.
At even relatively low G-forces, fighter pilots have impaired vision – or “grey out” – as the blood pressure to the head drops. Fortunately, in conventional spacecraft – such as the Russian Soyuz – astronauts are orientated so the acceleration is felt through their chest. 
T-plus 10 minutes: Nausea“One of the first things that astronauts complain about is nausea or vomiting,” says Fong. This effect of the lack of gravity on the sensitive inner ear affects balance, co-ordination and spatial orientation. “It also affects your ability to track moving objects,” he adds, “which has implications for your piloting skills.”
Quite apart from the unpleasantness of vomit globules floating around the capsule, space sickness can leave you debilitated and unable to perform assigned tasks. One instance of space sickness almost set back the entire Apollo Moon landing programme. During Apollo 9 – the first test of the lunar lander in orbit – Rusty Schweickart was initially unable to carry out some of his tasks and a spacewalk had to be cut short.
T-plus two days: A fat faceBeing in space is like standing on your head; fluids tend to pool in the upper part of your body, giving you a swollen face. It is similar to when your ankles swell on a long-duration flight because fluid pools in your feet.
“Your body preferentially drives fluid towards the upper part of the body,” explains Fong. “When you’re in microgravity, all those systems still work to push fluids to the upper body, unopposed by gravity, so you get this swelling of tissues in the head.”
But looking fat is the least of your problems. A recent study also suggests that spaceflight can affect eyesight. Using MRI scanners, researchers at the University of Texas found anomalies in two thirds of the astronauts they examined.
“The underlying cause of this is not fully understood,” admits Nasa spokesman William Jeffs. “In some crew members, in addition to mild visual changes, there have been findings such as optic nerve swelling, retinal changes, changes in the shape of the eye and a suggestion that there might be an increase in intracranial pressure.”
T-plus one week: Muscle and bone lossAs the gravity slips away, your body starts to deteriorate.
“A lot of the body’s systems depend upon gravity to keep them conditioned,” explains Fong. “In some experiments with rats, they’ve seen up to a third of muscle from particular muscle groups being lost within seven to 10 days of flight – that’s a huge, huge loss.”
This also includes deterioration of heart muscle. And while it is not a problem when you are floating around in the International Space Station (ISS), it’s a mission-critical issue if you plan to land on Mars and your crew arrives, 200 million kilometres from home, unable to walk.
Since the dawn of the space age, scientists have been developing ways to help astronauts maintain body strength. Each ISS crew member is scheduled for an hour of cardiovascular training and an hour of weightlifting every day. Even then, they arrive back on Earth, after six months in orbit, struggling to walk.
Lack of gravity also has the effect of causing bone to, almost literally, dissolve away. “They’ve seen losses from specific load-bearing sites of 1-2% a month,” says Fong. “That’s a tremendous amount of bone to lose and of calcium to put into the blood stream.”
For future Mars walkers, this is a potentially devastating effect. Imagine if one small step for mankind were to result in a broken leg.
T-plus two weeks: Sleep deprivation “Sleep deprivation is one of the most prevalent problems,” says Fong. “Astronauts’ circadian rhythms, their light-dark cycle, are really messed-up”. This is a particular issue in orbit where, with a new dawn every 90 minutes, astronauts struggle to adapt to artificial night times.
On top of this, they arrive in space overexcited, work shifts and have to adjust to sleeping strapped to the wall in a sleeping bag.
To counter the effects of sleep deprivation, the ISS is equipped with individual sleeping compartments, which can be darkened to simulate night, and a new LED lighting system is being tested to reduce the harshness of the unnatural light on board.
T-plus one year: Disease There is growing evidence that spaceflight has a detrimental effect on the immune system. A Nasa study found that the white blood cells of fruit flies flown in orbit were less effective at engulfing invading microorganisms and fighting infection than those of genetically identical flies on the ground.
This research backs related work involving space-faring mice, other insects and salamanders that shows spaceflight makes animals more susceptible to disease. Again, it is likely that the lack of gravity is to blame.
More concerning is the effect of cosmic radiation. Astronauts often report “seeing” bright flashes of light, which are caused by cosmic rays passing through their brains. The ISS orbits sufficiently low for the Earth’s atmosphere to protect its inhabitants from the worst effects of cosmic radiation. However, once in deep space – on the way to the Moon or Mars, for example – the dangers of lethal doses of radiation become an increasing worry and may even make long duration missions too dangerous.
[Continue Reading→]

we-are-star-stuff:

The effects of space travel on the human body

Many people dream of travelling into orbit, to the Moon or even beyond. However, those who experience the reality of spaceflight face a succession of potential health problems.

“Space isn’t an environment we’ve evolved to survive in,” says Kevin Fong, founder of the Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme Environment Medicine at University College London. “It’s wrong to conceive space travel as this long haul flight with some floating around thrown in – it’s an expedition, like any other expedition.”

So, let’s say you are lucky enough to have bagged yourself a space flight. As you lie back on your couch during the final seconds of countdown, what can you expect to happen to your body over the coming minutes, hours, days or even months? Here’s a timeline of effects from those in the know – scientists, engineers and astronauts who can speak from experience about what happens when human bodies are pushed to the limit, and how to best deal with it.

T-plus 10 seconds: Possible loss of consciousness 

The spacecraft has cleared the tower and the acceleration is building to 4G. Your body feels four times its normal weight. Crushed back into the seat, moving your arms is increasingly difficult.

“G-forces push blood into the feet and we need blood supply to our brain to stay conscious,” explained Jon Scott, Senior Scientist at Qinetiq’s Human Sciences division.

At even relatively low G-forces, fighter pilots have impaired vision – or “grey out” – as the blood pressure to the head drops. Fortunately, in conventional spacecraft – such as the Russian Soyuz – astronauts are orientated so the acceleration is felt through their chest. 

T-plus 10 minutes: Nausea

“One of the first things that astronauts complain about is nausea or vomiting,” says Fong. This effect of the lack of gravity on the sensitive inner ear affects balance, co-ordination and spatial orientation. “It also affects your ability to track moving objects,” he adds, “which has implications for your piloting skills.”

Quite apart from the unpleasantness of vomit globules floating around the capsule, space sickness can leave you debilitated and unable to perform assigned tasks. One instance of space sickness almost set back the entire Apollo Moon landing programme. During Apollo 9 – the first test of the lunar lander in orbit – Rusty Schweickart was initially unable to carry out some of his tasks and a spacewalk had to be cut short.

T-plus two days: A fat face

Being in space is like standing on your head; fluids tend to pool in the upper part of your body, giving you a swollen face. It is similar to when your ankles swell on a long-duration flight because fluid pools in your feet.

“Your body preferentially drives fluid towards the upper part of the body,” explains Fong. “When you’re in microgravity, all those systems still work to push fluids to the upper body, unopposed by gravity, so you get this swelling of tissues in the head.”

But looking fat is the least of your problems. A recent study also suggests that spaceflight can affect eyesight. Using MRI scanners, researchers at the University of Texas found anomalies in two thirds of the astronauts they examined.

“The underlying cause of this is not fully understood,” admits Nasa spokesman William Jeffs. “In some crew members, in addition to mild visual changes, there have been findings such as optic nerve swelling, retinal changes, changes in the shape of the eye and a suggestion that there might be an increase in intracranial pressure.”

T-plus one week: Muscle and bone loss

As the gravity slips away, your body starts to deteriorate.

“A lot of the body’s systems depend upon gravity to keep them conditioned,” explains Fong. “In some experiments with rats, they’ve seen up to a third of muscle from particular muscle groups being lost within seven to 10 days of flight – that’s a huge, huge loss.”

This also includes deterioration of heart muscle. And while it is not a problem when you are floating around in the International Space Station (ISS), it’s a mission-critical issue if you plan to land on Mars and your crew arrives, 200 million kilometres from home, unable to walk.

Since the dawn of the space age, scientists have been developing ways to help astronauts maintain body strength. Each ISS crew member is scheduled for an hour of cardiovascular training and an hour of weightlifting every day. Even then, they arrive back on Earth, after six months in orbit, struggling to walk.

Lack of gravity also has the effect of causing bone to, almost literally, dissolve away. “They’ve seen losses from specific load-bearing sites of 1-2% a month,” says Fong. “That’s a tremendous amount of bone to lose and of calcium to put into the blood stream.”

For future Mars walkers, this is a potentially devastating effect. Imagine if one small step for mankind were to result in a broken leg.

T-plus two weeks: Sleep deprivation 

“Sleep deprivation is one of the most prevalent problems,” says Fong. “Astronauts’ circadian rhythms, their light-dark cycle, are really messed-up”. This is a particular issue in orbit where, with a new dawn every 90 minutes, astronauts struggle to adapt to artificial night times.

On top of this, they arrive in space overexcited, work shifts and have to adjust to sleeping strapped to the wall in a sleeping bag.

To counter the effects of sleep deprivation, the ISS is equipped with individual sleeping compartments, which can be darkened to simulate night, and a new LED lighting system is being tested to reduce the harshness of the unnatural light on board.

T-plus one year: Disease 

There is growing evidence that spaceflight has a detrimental effect on the immune system. A Nasa study found that the white blood cells of fruit flies flown in orbit were less effective at engulfing invading microorganisms and fighting infection than those of genetically identical flies on the ground.

This research backs related work involving space-faring mice, other insects and salamanders that shows spaceflight makes animals more susceptible to disease. Again, it is likely that the lack of gravity is to blame.

More concerning is the effect of cosmic radiation. Astronauts often report “seeing” bright flashes of light, which are caused by cosmic rays passing through their brains. The ISS orbits sufficiently low for the Earth’s atmosphere to protect its inhabitants from the worst effects of cosmic radiation. However, once in deep space – on the way to the Moon or Mars, for example – the dangers of lethal doses of radiation become an increasing worry and may even make long duration missions too dangerous.

[Continue Reading→]

Oct 3 '14
nasahistory:

This may not be a photo of a Saturn V rocket, or some famous astronaut.  Instead, a photo I found in honor of National Coffee Day (a poor attempt at a “holiday” or sorts), I thought this post encapsulates the spirit of the day with some fine coffee “artwork”. 
My Blogs:
Beautiful WarbirdsFull AfterburnerThe Test PilotsP-38 LightningNasa HistoryScience Fiction WorldFantasy Literature & Art

nasahistory:

This may not be a photo of a Saturn V rocket, or some famous astronaut.  Instead, a photo I found in honor of National Coffee Day (a poor attempt at a “holiday” or sorts), I thought this post encapsulates the spirit of the day with some fine coffee “artwork”. 

My Blogs:

Beautiful Warbirds
Full Afterburner
The Test Pilots
P-38 Lightning
Nasa History
Science Fiction World
Fantasy Literature & Art

Oct 3 '14
aftoiasis:

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle |  thru NASA

aftoiasis:

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle |  thru NASA

Oct 2 '14
spaceexp:

Milky Way over The Three Sisters, AB
Source: CoinSlot (reddit)

spaceexp:

Milky Way over The Three Sisters, AB

Source: CoinSlot (reddit)

Oct 2 '14
spaceexp:

Endeavour docked at the ISS

spaceexp:

Endeavour docked at the ISS

Sep 28 '14
mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”
"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.
"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."
Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.
The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.
Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.
Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.
Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.
"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."

mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)

Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”

"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.

"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."

Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.

The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.

Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.

Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.

Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.

"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."

Sep 26 '14
the-actual-universe:

scientificphilosopher:

Stunning gif of Saturn’s auroras.

Evidently these are created from Hubble data! Neat. Click the link to see more, or watch the video here.

the-actual-universe:

scientificphilosopher:

Stunning gif of Saturn’s auroras.

Evidently these are created from Hubble data! Neat. Click the link to see more, or watch the video here.

Sep 26 '14
Sep 22 '14
pennyfornasa:

"Time for this nation to take a clearly leading role in space achievement, which in many ways may hold the key to our future on Earth." - President KennedyOn September 12, 1962, President John F. Kennedy, in an effort to rally public support for his goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth,” delivered one of the most inspirational and prescient policy speeches in history at Rice University.Listen to President Kennedy’s speech in our ‘Spirit of Apollo’ video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G6jhUznonU

pennyfornasa:

"Time for this nation to take a clearly leading role in space achievement, which in many ways may hold the key to our future on Earth." - President Kennedy

On September 12, 1962, President John F. Kennedy, in an effort to rally public support for his goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth,” delivered one of the most inspirational and prescient policy speeches in history at Rice University.

Listen to President Kennedy’s speech in our ‘Spirit of Apollo’ video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G6jhUznonU

Sep 21 '14

humanoidhistory:

September 14, 1966 — Gorgeous views of the Earth made from the orbiting Gemini 11 spacecraft. In the bottom image, you can see the 100-foot tether line connecting the Agena Target Vehicle to the Gemini 11 vehicle during its 32nd revolution. In the top image, that’s India and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) in the breathtakingly blue and vast Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, and Bay of Bengal. In the center, you can see back home to Cape Kennedy at left center. (NASA)

Sep 20 '14
spaceexp:

A long exposure from the ISS - capturing star trails, the Aurora Borealis, even lightning storms and cities. photo by Don Pettit, NASA

spaceexp:

A long exposure from the ISS - capturing star trails, the Aurora Borealis, even lightning storms and cities. photo by Don Pettit, NASA

Sep 18 '14
spacetimecontinumm:

Terraformation of Mars: A New Look
We look at Mars now as a forgotten Red Planet that almost seems barren and life-less judging from our available images and study of it. But study shows Mars was once as ecologically prosperous as our own Earth. But what happened to all of its waters? Better yet why is it so dry and lacking any plants? Once the abundance of oxygen left and the waters froze over or dried off the planet became what it is today. But what if we can in a way reactivate’ Mars? Welcome to Mars, Terraformed’.
About Terraforming
Transforming Mars will be a long and complicated process. But this is exactly the type of subject that interests space researchers like Christopher McKay of NASA Ames Research Center. First, greenhouse gases, like chlorofluorocarbons that contribute to the growing ozone layer on Earth, will be released into the atmosphere. This traps the heat from the Sun and raises the surface temperature by an average of 4 degrees Celsius. In order to achieve this, factories would manufacture chlorofluorocarbons derived from the air and soil. A single factory would require the power equivalent of a large nuclear power plant.
The increasing temperature would vaporize some of the carbon dioxide in the south polar cap. Introducing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere would produce additional warming, melting more of the polar cap until it has been vaporized completely. This would produce an average temperature rise of 70 degrees Celsius.
With the temperature this high, ice will start melting, providing the water needed to sustain life. This water would raise the atmospheric pressure to the equivalent of some mountaintops. While this would be a survivable level, it may still require the use of an oxygen mask. The next step, which may take up to several centuries, would be to plant trees that thrive on carbon dioxide and produce oxygen.

NASA: Terraforming Mars
Terraforming is the process of transforming a hostile environment into one suitable for human life. Being that Mars is the most Earth-like planet, it is the best candidate for terraforming. Once just the subject of science fiction novels, it is now becoming a viable research area. The famed astronomer and Pulitzer prize winner, Carl Sagan, says that there is enormous promise in the search for ancient life on Mars. If life was once sustainable on Mars, it is important to know what caused Mars to evolve into the cold and lifeless planet it is today. With this knowledge, we can terraform Mars by reversing the process.
NASA scientists believe that it is technologically possible at the present time to create considerable global climate changes, allowing humans to live on Mars. But this will not be by any means an easy task. Raising the atmospheric pressure and surface temperature alone could be achieved in a few decades.
This research has strong environmental implications for Earth. What researchers are trying to do involves global warming, a sort of greenhouse effect on the cold planet Mars. Scientists may be able to test their hypotheses about global warming in their attempts to elevate Mars’ surface temperature. Likewise, once theories, they may be applied to our own planet in an attempt to reverse environmental damage done by pollution and deforestation.

spacetimecontinumm:

Terraformation of Mars: A New Look

We look at Mars now as a forgotten Red Planet that almost seems barren and life-less judging from our available images and study of it. But study shows Mars was once as ecologically prosperous as our own Earth. But what happened to all of its waters? Better yet why is it so dry and lacking any plants? Once the abundance of oxygen left and the waters froze over or dried off the planet became what it is today. But what if we can in a way reactivate’ Mars? Welcome to Mars, Terraformed’.

About Terraforming

Transforming Mars will be a long and complicated process. But this is exactly the type of subject that interests space researchers like Christopher McKay of NASA Ames Research Center. First, greenhouse gases, like chlorofluorocarbons that contribute to the growing ozone layer on Earth, will be released into the atmosphere. This traps the heat from the Sun and raises the surface temperature by an average of 4 degrees Celsius. In order to achieve this, factories would manufacture chlorofluorocarbons derived from the air and soil. A single factory would require the power equivalent of a large nuclear power plant.

The increasing temperature would vaporize some of the carbon dioxide in the south polar cap. Introducing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere would produce additional warming, melting more of the polar cap until it has been vaporized completely. This would produce an average temperature rise of 70 degrees Celsius.

With the temperature this high, ice will start melting, providing the water needed to sustain life. This water would raise the atmospheric pressure to the equivalent of some mountaintops. While this would be a survivable level, it may still require the use of an oxygen mask. The next step, which may take up to several centuries, would be to plant trees that thrive on carbon dioxide and produce oxygen.

image

NASA: Terraforming Mars

Terraforming is the process of transforming a hostile environment into one suitable for human life. Being that Mars is the most Earth-like planet, it is the best candidate for terraforming. Once just the subject of science fiction novels, it is now becoming a viable research area. The famed astronomer and Pulitzer prize winner, Carl Sagan, says that there is enormous promise in the search for ancient life on Mars. If life was once sustainable on Mars, it is important to know what caused Mars to evolve into the cold and lifeless planet it is today. With this knowledge, we can terraform Mars by reversing the process.

NASA scientists believe that it is technologically possible at the present time to create considerable global climate changes, allowing humans to live on Mars. But this will not be by any means an easy task. Raising the atmospheric pressure and surface temperature alone could be achieved in a few decades.

This research has strong environmental implications for Earth. What researchers are trying to do involves global warming, a sort of greenhouse effect on the cold planet Mars. Scientists may be able to test their hypotheses about global warming in their attempts to elevate Mars’ surface temperature. Likewise, once theories, they may be applied to our own planet in an attempt to reverse environmental damage done by pollution and deforestation.

Sep 18 '14
brianmichaelbendis:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.
The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen. This was his explanation:
"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"
JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

It’s scary how much sense this makes.

brianmichaelbendis:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.

The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen.

This was his explanation:

"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"

JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)
By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

It’s scary how much sense this makes.

(Source: thecomicsvault)