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Amity, as you know, means friendship

Posts tagged space shuttle

Jul 28 '14
pennyfornasa:

For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. However, according to a space.com article, the space shuttle program has had significant cultural impacts as well."One of the greatest legacies of the space shuttle has been its ability to open space to more and different types of people," stated Robert Pearlman, editor of collectSPACE.com. "Many nations saw their first citizen enter space aboard the shuttle, including Canada, Mexico, Japan, Australia, Saudi Arabia and Spain. The first American female and African-American entered space on the shuttle. The first American of Jewish descent and the oldest person to ever enter space flew on the shuttle, too."On July 8th, 2011, the launch of STS-135 proved historic, as it was the final flight of the Space Shuttle program, with Atlantis being the mode of transportation. Lasting 12 days, 18 hours, and 28 minutes, STS-135 was an ISS supply mission, with a spacewalk scheduled on the fifth day for ISS maintenance. After successfully completing their mission objectives, the crew prepared Atlantis for its 33rd — and final — reentry and landing procedure, which occurred on July 21st. By the end of this mission, Atlantis racked up some impressive stats. The shuttle orbited the Earth 4,848 times, and in doing so, traveled nearly 126 million miles — more than 525 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. After three decades and 14 satellite deployments, Atlantis was the workhorse of the shuttle fleet. STS-135 CAPCOM operator Barry Wilmore recognized the importance of Atlantis’ final Florida landing."We congratulate you, Atlantis, as well as the thousands of passionate individuals across this great space faring nation who truly empowered this incredible spacecraft which has inspired millions around the globe."Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmosfor passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ Sources:1. Space Shuttle’s Lasting Legacy: 30 Years of Historic Featshttp://goo.gl/30Ktma2. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuzhttp://goo.gl/bQKAYImage Credit: NASA

pennyfornasa:

For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. However, according to a space.com article, the space shuttle program has had significant cultural impacts as well.

"One of the greatest legacies of the space shuttle has been its ability to open space to more and different types of people," stated Robert Pearlman, editor of collectSPACE.com. "Many nations saw their first citizen enter space aboard the shuttle, including Canada, Mexico, Japan, Australia, Saudi Arabia and Spain. The first American female and African-American entered space on the shuttle. The first American of Jewish descent and the oldest person to ever enter space flew on the shuttle, too."

On July 8th, 2011, the launch of STS-135 proved historic, as it was the final flight of the Space Shuttle program, with Atlantis being the mode of transportation. Lasting 12 days, 18 hours, and 28 minutes, STS-135 was an ISS supply mission, with a spacewalk scheduled on the fifth day for ISS maintenance. After successfully completing their mission objectives, the crew prepared Atlantis for its 33rd — and final — reentry and landing procedure, which occurred on July 21st. By the end of this mission, Atlantis racked up some impressive stats. The shuttle orbited the Earth 4,848 times, and in doing so, traveled nearly 126 million miles — more than 525 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. After three decades and 14 satellite deployments, Atlantis was the workhorse of the shuttle fleet. STS-135 CAPCOM operator Barry Wilmore recognized the importance of Atlantis’ final Florida landing.

"We congratulate you, Atlantis, as well as the thousands of passionate individuals across this great space faring nation who truly empowered this incredible spacecraft which has inspired millions around the globe."

Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmosfor passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. 

This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: 

http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ 

Sources:
1. Space Shuttle’s Lasting Legacy: 30 Years of Historic Feats
http://goo.gl/30Ktma
2. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuz
http://goo.gl/bQKAY

Image Credit: NASA

Jul 27 '14

projecthabu:

     After 306 days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 43 seconds of flight, over the span of 33 missions, Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, OV-104, on display at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Titusville, Florida, is now the centerpiece of the most breathtaking aerospace museum presentation I’ve ever visited.

     This orbiter flew many relatively important missions, including the final Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission in 2009. STS-125 performed five EVAs during the mission, and restored the important telescope, extending its life well beyond original design spec.

     It’s truly surreal to walk up right beside this enormous rocket plane. I found it difficult to take the whole thing in at once. It’s overwhelming in a really good way. I wrote more about the experience, and shared several more photos in a previous post (click here to view).

Jul 21 '14
pennyfornasa:

After completing 200 orbits of the Earth for nearly thirteen days, Atlantis made its 33rd — and final — landing on July 21st, 2011, as STS-135 was the final mission of the Space Shuttle program. For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. "The space shuttle changed the way we view the world, the way we view the universe," STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson said soon after landing. "America’s not going to stop exploring. Thanks for protecting us and bringing this program to a fitting end."Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos for passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ 
"End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch" was the sixth episode of The Sagan Series. It can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/RxRJxD 
Sources:1. STS-135 Landing Bloghttp://goo.gl/OUYT52. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuzhttp://goo.gl/bQKAY

pennyfornasa:

After completing 200 orbits of the Earth for nearly thirteen days, Atlantis made its 33rd — and final — landing on July 21st, 2011, as STS-135 was the final mission of the Space Shuttle program. For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. 

"The space shuttle changed the way we view the world, the way we view the universe," STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson said soon after landing. "America’s not going to stop exploring. Thanks for protecting us and bringing this program to a fitting end."

Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos for passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. 

This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: 

http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ 

"End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch" was the sixth episode of The Sagan Series. It can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/RxRJxD 

Sources:
1. STS-135 Landing Blog
http://goo.gl/OUYT5
2. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuz
http://goo.gl/bQKAY

Jul 1 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Discovery landing on the KSC runway to complete STS-133. The last daytime landing.
Source: RocketMan1967 (reddit)

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Discovery landing on the KSC runway to complete STS-133. The last daytime landing.

Source: RocketMan1967 (reddit)

Jun 27 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis

Jun 19 '14

(Source: m1k3y)

Jun 4 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center
Source: Insite Image

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center

Source: Insite Image

May 22 '14
spaceexp:

Florida, USA: Atop gigantic pillars of fire NASA’s Space Shuttle Atlantis — sporting Prandtl-Glauert condensation due to the Prandtl-Glauert Singularity and sprouting shock waves — majestically soars towards space on 8 September 2000.

spaceexp:

Florida, USA: Atop gigantic pillars of fire NASA’s Space Shuttle Atlantis — sporting Prandtl-Glauert condensation due to the Prandtl-Glauert Singularity and sprouting shock waves — majestically soars towards space on 8 September 2000.

May 21 '14
spaceexp:

Last view of Atlantis before it entered it’s new home
Source: TomSteiner

spaceexp:

Last view of Atlantis before it entered it’s new home

Source: TomSteiner

May 6 '14
spaceexp:

Endeavour STS-118 Docked with ISS

spaceexp:

Endeavour STS-118 Docked with ISS

Apr 8 '14
spaceexp:

Today in 1983, the first spacewalk of the shuttle program: Astronauts Story Musgrave, left, and Don Peterson float in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger during their April 7, 1983, spacewalk on the STS-6 mission

spaceexp:

Today in 1983, the first spacewalk of the shuttle program: Astronauts Story Musgrave, left, and Don Peterson float in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger during their April 7, 1983, spacewalk on the STS-6 mission

Mar 31 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis
Source: Dexter A. Pinto

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis

Source: Dexter A. Pinto

Mar 31 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis
Source: Dexter A. Pinto

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis

Source: Dexter A. Pinto

Mar 31 '14
spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis
Source: Dexter A. Pinto

Is it weird that I see this and tear up? That I think of Atlantis as “my girl?”

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Atlantis

Source: Dexter A. Pinto

Is it weird that I see this and tear up? That I think of Atlantis as “my girl?”

Mar 17 '14
spaceexp:

Less than 45 seconds after main engine start, the Space Shuttle has already reached transonic speeds, as evidenced by the condensation cones forming around the boosters and orbiter.

spaceexp:

Less than 45 seconds after main engine start, the Space Shuttle has already reached transonic speeds, as evidenced by the condensation cones forming around the boosters and orbiter.